As a future medical biller or healthcare provider, you are applying with an astounding resume indicating your experiences in the medical field. Excited to start and grab your first job in the healthcare industry, that’s why you are preparing yourself for an interview. However, what keeps you stuck is the appropriate attire that you will be wearing to successful get the job of a medical biller at ePsych Billing, for example.

Planning your attire for the interview should also be given priority in the first place. Always keep in mind that your physical appearance is the visual representation of yourself. Also, it is important to check those fashion tips on how to go on color combination. Yet, that doesn’t replace the reality that interviewers unknowingly make judgements depending on your attire.

How to dress appropriately during an interview

Like other professions, being in a healthcare industry needs someone to be clean and decent looking. This may also applies true during an interview. Below are some tips on the proper way of dressing yourself up during a healthcare interview.

Look professional

As the saying goes,

Dress according to the job that you want and dress not based on the job that you have.

It also applies even to interviews in which you always want to showcase the best of your ability. There are interviews that only demand for a casual attire. Even so, you have to be professionally dressed up during the interview. For women, it is advisable to be on a dress slacks or a skirt paired with a nice blouse. On the other hand, a combination of a dress slacks and a nice shirt is ideal for men.

Be comfortable

The job of a healthcare provider or a medical biller demand for various movement in quite some time. On the instance, it is essential that your professional attire will not make you feel uncomfortable during the interview. It is okay for men to loose the tie a little bit and go without the jacket on. Meanwhile, women should try not to put on too much jewelry and excessively high heels. During the interview, it would be better to look professional and practical at the same time.

Be appropriate

Having an interview for a job especially in a healthcare field, a semi-conservative dress is pretty much advisable. This simple means plunging necklines, mini-skirts, or sagging pants are not allowed. Just a friendly tip, trying your outfit before hand is a good idea. This is to ensure that it really fits on you well enough without making you worry on exposing too much skin. Moreover, it will also lets you to move freely.

Vendors sort their goods along the railway line in a suburb of Kampala, the capital of Uganda. They open large bales of clothing of 45 kilos. The clothing comes from Europe, the United States, and Australia. The bales have prints such as ‘baby’ and ‘sexy tops’.

This clothing is sold commercially on the market. But governments in East Africa are no longer waiting for our cast-offs.

Underwear For Less Than A Euro

25-year-old Sheila Apoo is grabbing a pile of second-hand trousers at the market. She regularly shops here, she says. “The clothing is cheap, of good quality and because it comes from all over the world, there is an enormous amount of choice.” T-shirts, pants or dresses are, depending on the quality, sold for an amount between one and two euros. Underwear, also second-hand, costs less than a euro.

The market vendors of second-hand clothing are happy with the business opportunity. The business helped them bring their children to school and put on a roof over their heads. The business helped them create a home built with good materials such as those provided by this website – Tampa Bay Roofs.

Government Wants To Ban Second Hand Clothing Business In Uganda

Although the customers are happy with the clothing, the government of Uganda wants to ban the trade in second-hand clothing.

The largest textile factory in Uganda is called Nytil and is located at the source of the Nile. Hundreds of dressmakers sit side by side in long rows and assemble T-shirts, shirts and school uniforms.

The textile factory has more than 2000 employees but says it has the capacity to grow. If only they get the chance. “We can dress the Ugandan,” says manager Williem Okello. “But second-hand clothing and also the import of clothing from China makes it difficult for us.”

Ugandan Clothing Is Expensive

More demand for Ugandan clothing means more work not only for spinners and seamstresses but also for cotton farmers and companies that process the raw cotton. Creating employment is, of course, a good goal, says Ugandan economist Fred Muhumuza. He is nevertheless deeply concerned about the government’s plan. According to him, the country has no capacity at all to dive into the gap if the second-hand clothing falls away.

Moreover, it is extremely disadvantageous for the consumer to buy locally. “The clothing that is made in Uganda is much more expensive,” he says. “Many Ugandans have little to spend, so when buying clothes becomes more expensive, it really weighs on their budget.”

In recent years, Uganda has increased the import tax on second-hand clothing in order to limit imports. But they have committed themselves to a total ban from next year.

Better Solutions Are Needed

Yet economist Muhumuza hopes for a step-by-step plan of many years. “We need to gradually curtail second-hand clothing while at the same time expanding our own textile industry. That way we can hopefully also reduce the price of local clothing.”

Olivia Kansiime calls on its customers to the second-hand market. “A bodysuit for less than 50 cents, a bargain.” The single mother of three young children is afraid that she will not get Ugandan clothes sold, even if the price of locally made clothes goes down.

She takes a Ugandan T-shirt and a European T-shirt. “Do you see the seams and the fabric? Ugandan clothing is not only more expensive but also of poorer quality. This is not what my customers want. We prefer to use used and from abroad, rather than new and local.”